51 In Edibles/ Gardening

A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries

When I first started gardening, I couldn't wait to try growing strawberries! These red berries are jam-packed full of vitamins, fiber and antioxidants. I can never resist a bite of a plump, juicy and sweet strawberry. I remember visiting my local garden nursery and noticing these bright red hanging baskets. As I got closer, I noticed they were filled with flowering strawberry plants. What? You can grow them like this? In fact, you can indeed grow berries in hanging baskets. I will go into detail about this below!

Once you learn to grow your berries, you can harvest them and make a bunch of delicious confections and treats. Chocolate covered strawberries, strawberry lemonade, strawberry shortcake, berry jam, fruit tarts and the list just goes on! Here, I will be sharing with you a simple guide to growing strawberries. Read on to learn more! A Simple Guide To Growing Strawberries | Angie The Freckled Rose

Once you learn to grow your berries, you can harvest them and make a bunch of delicious confections and treats. Chocolate covered strawberries, strawberry lemonade, strawberry shortcake, berry jam, fruit tarts and the list just goes on! Here, I will be sharing with you a simple guide to growing strawberries. Read on to learn more!

Fast Facts About Strawberries

A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

Are strawberries perennials or annuals? Hardy perennials

Strawberries are perennials in zones 3 through 9. In zones 9 and 10, they are grown as cool-season annuals. It is important to note that if you grow strawberries in containers, they either need to be brought inside during the winter months or transplanted into the ground in the fall. It is also important to know that most strawberry plants produce well for 3 to 4 years. Once they pass this mark, they will produce less fruit. If you plant a variety that has runner plants, you will continue to harvest berries through your new, younger plants!

Do they grow in sun or shade? Full sun to part shade

These tasty crop require 6 to 10 hours a day of full sun. They will not thrive and produce the amount of fruit you are looking for in full shade. If you have an area that is part shade receiving at least 6 hours, your plants should produce just fine. My small warning is, depending on your growing conditions, your plants could become stunted, and you may see less berries. I grew mine in part shade the first year I ever grew strawberry plants, and I didn't have any problems at all! If you plant in direct sunlight, you will notice more abundant harvests and even bigger fruit. 

Where can I grow my berries? Anywhere 

Strawberries are one of those plants that you can grow just about anywhere. You can grow them right in the ground in rows, strawberry pots, raised beds, containers, window boxes and even hanging baskets! My first experience with strawberries was in hanging baskets. I was so impressed and excited to see how much fruit each basket produced! The next year I tried out strawberry pots and loved my results. Then, I tried a raised bed, and eventually made myself my very own strawberry patch! They are not picky, and don't need much depth to thrive making it a very versatile crop.

Strawberries flowering in my three year old patch. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

Strawberries flowering in my three year old patch

How much space do I need? From as small as a mason jar to as big as a field

Depending on the variety you choose, strawberry plants do best spaced 6 to 18 inches apart. They need about 6 to 12 inches of depth to thrive. The rule of thumb when it comes to containers is the bigger the better. It also depends on how many strawberries you are looking to harvest. You can add one plant per strawberry jar and 3 to 5 plants in a hanging basket or window box. If you are a small-space gardener, consider growing vertically. This helps you grow more plants in a smaller area.

Read all about how I grew strawberries in my GreenStalk Garden last season!

What kind of soil do I need? Well-drained, slightly acidic, enriched soil

Strawberries grow best in soil with lots of organic matter. You want to make sure the soil is well-drained and slightly acidic with a pH of 5.0-7.0. Strawberry plants can adapt to many different soil conditions. If you are looking for your plants to produce a large amount of fruit, you want to give your strawberries the ideal conditions. If the soil in your area doesn't have the correct conditions, consider planting them in pots. It's much easier to control your soil by adding potting mix and the organic matter it requires.

How much water will my plants require? Frequent waterings - Every 3 to 5 days

Strawberry plants have very shallow root systems. Because of this, it is important to keep your soil moist. Watering every 3 to 5 days works best. If you are experiencing a drought, you may want to check on your plants to see if they require more water. Moisture is your key to developing large, plump berries. If you are worried about your fruit rotting, you can switch to a drip-irrigation system that is hooked up to a timer. That way, your plants get a healthy drink of water everyday!

A PVC pipe with some holes drilled in it makes watering strawberry pots a cinch. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

A PVC pipe with some holes drilled in it makes watering strawberry pots a cinch

Should I add fertilizer? If so, what kind and how often? Yes, but it is not required.

If you feel like your plants need a boost, they appreciate nitrogen-rich fertilizer. This helps encourage growth and helps your fruit develop. If you decide not to add fertilizer, your plants should still grow just fine! 

I am a novice gardener. Can I grow strawberries? Absolutely!

Strawberries were one of the first crops that really helped me enter the edible gardening world successfully. Since they are such a hardy plant, you can try out different growing methods and see what works best for you. As long as you have the right amount of sun, the proper soil, a protective cover and a watering schedule you are good to go!

Strawberries growing in my GreenStalk Garden last year. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

Strawberries growing in my GreenStalk Garden last year

*  Tip *  As you become more experienced with gardening, you will notice that most crops and flowers are adaptable to many different conditions. In order to give your plants the best chance at growing strong, you want to give your crop the exact requirements to avoid disappointment. They will usually find a way, but when putting so much work and care into growing them, you want them to thrive!

Types Of Strawberries

A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.comJune Bearing: This type of strawberry will produce one large crop of berries for you each growing season, usually in June. They make a wonderful ground cover by producing an abundance of runner plants. The harvest time for this variety is around 10 days. It's best not to plant this kind of strawberry plant if you are worried about any late spring frosts. You have more of a chance of dealing with damage to your crop and frost killing your spring blooms.  

June Bearing strawberries growing in the garden. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

June Bearing strawberries growing in the garden

Favorite Varieties - Sequoia, Allstar, EarliGlo 

Everbearing: This type of strawberry will produce fruit throughout the growing season. They are also known as day-neutral strawberries. You will start to notice ripe berries at the beginning of spring. You will be able to pick strawberries up until fall, although the amount will taper off as the season progresses. This kind of strawberry plant sends out less runners, allowing the plant to put it's energy into producing multiple crops.

Favorite Varieties - Ozark Beauty, Quinault, Albion 

Gasana Ever-Bearing strawberry flowering. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

Gasana Ever-Bearing strawberry flowering

Wild Strawberries: I am less familiar with growing this type of strawberry. I do plan on and am excited to try some varieties this year. Some people actually consider wild strawberries a weed! They grow in woodlands and open fields. They tend to have smaller berries than the store bought varieties and make excellent ground cover. You can harvest wild strawberries April through June. You can also grow these as a treat for the wildlife in your yard! I will be planting the varieties listed below this year!

Favorite Varieties - Yellow Wonder, Red Wonder, White Soul Alpine Strawberry

Strawberries ripening in the early morning hours. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

Strawberries ripening in the early morning hours

*  Extra *  For those who love to grow strawberries in containers like I do, these varieties of strawberries do very well in pots, window boxes and hanging baskets. My favorites are Tribute, Tristar & Seascape!

Growing Tips & Tricks

A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

• Mulch around your strawberry plants with straw to retain moisture & cut down on weeds.

• Make sure to weed regularly. Weeds will compete for nutrition & weaken your plants.

•Keep soil moist, but make sure it is well-drained. Wet soil will promote fungus and mold. 

•Fertilize strawberry plants every two weeks to promote growth. 

•Cover strawberry plants with fabric to prevent birds & animals from eating your crops. 

•Replace old plants that produce poorly. Replace around three to five years.

•Pinch off runner plants during first growing season to produce larger fruit. 

•Harvest berries as soon as fruit ripens. Allowing fruit to rot will attract pests and disease.

•Make sure to add 2 inches of mulch around plants during winter months for insulation.

 * Helpful Hint * Click here to find the varieties that grow best in your state! 

A strawberry blossom. A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | Angie The Freckled Rose

Harvesting & Storing Strawberries

A Simple Guide to Growing Strawberries | angiethefreckledrose.com

How do I know when it's time to pick my berries? It's important to read up on the type of variety you are growing. Your berry can range in size anywhere from 1 inch to 3 inches when fully grown. Also, it depends on if you choose June-bearing or Everbearing. Keep in mind that strawberries are usually ready to be picked 28-30 days after full bloom.

How Frequently should I be picking? Your berries won't all ripen at the same time, so check frequently, and make sure to pick every 2-3 days. For most varieties, wait until your strawberries have fully turned red. Don't pick berries with green tips that aren't quite ripe yet.

Do you have any good advice when it comes to picking? It is best to pick in the early morning hours when the berries are still cool. While you are picking, keep an eye out for damaged or bruised fruit. Make sure to discard them to encourage more healthy growth. Also, try not to yank at your strawberry plants. I made this mistake. Your plants really don't appreciate it. Pick your fruit with one-quarter of the stem attached. Lightly pull and make sure to be gentle when putting them in your container/hod. 

It is best to pick in the early morning hours when the berries are still cool. While you are picking, keep an eye out for damaged or bruised fruit. Make sure to discard them to encourage more healthy growth. A Simple Guide To Growing Strawberries - Angie The Freckled Rose

What is the best way to store my strawberries? If you are looking to eat them fresh but not right away, they can be stored for 3 to 7 days in the fridge. If you are storing them in the fridge, make sure the caps are still on your berries and don't wash them. Pick a plastic container with a loose-fitting lid. Make sure do add a clean paper towel in the bottom of your container. Do not overcrowd the berries and arrange them in a single layer separated by a clean paper towel. 

I picked way more berries than I can eat. What do I do? Freeze them! Frozen strawberries can be used to make delicious jams, preserves, and can even be thrown into smoothies!

I didn't get a good harvest this year. Am I not good at growing strawberries? Absolutely not! There are so many factors that can go into not having a good crop. The weather is a huge factor. Way too much rain, not enough rain. Having a late frost can damage your plants. Pests can be a big problem, especially slugs. You can use plastic mulch to try and discourage them. Disease is sometimes unavoidable. 

It seems like so many things can go wrong. Should I still even try? Even though problems can sometimes arise, try different things! Some varieties are more disease resistant. If you are worried about a certain animal or pest, try growing them in a different location or adding row covers. If conditions are the problem, try growing them in a container where you have more control over the soil and the drainage.

There are so many different kinds of berries to pick from. I've been growing strawberries for around 5 years now. I've tried lots of different varieties by this point. This has lead me to having a good idea of which ones work best for me. This is different for everyone though, so have fun with it! 

 * Extra Credit * Plant these companion plants to give your crops an extra pollination boost & organic pest protection.

Borage - Will help naturally deter pests and parasites from your plants. Improves strawberries flavor. Attract pollinators.
Bush Beans - Helps fertilize soil and add nitrogen for strawberry plants. Deters beetles. Improves strawberry yields. 
Caraway - Attracts predators that help get rid of pests that attack strawberry plants, like parasitic wasps & parasitic flies.
Lupin - Fertilizes soil and adds nitrogen strawberries require. Attracts pollinators like honeybees.

Overall, strawberries are one of my favorite crops to grow. Have you grown, or are planning on trying to grow strawberry plants? Do you have any great tips? Please share with me in the comment section below! We will be back for more Tuesdays In The Garden fun on June 13, discussing summer planning in the garden. See you then!

Tuesdays In The Garden | Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month, we will be sharing a themed Tuesday In The Garden post! We will be covering seasonal crops, herb gardening, growing flowers, DIY projects, garden gifts, harvesting tips, preserving, garden to table recipes and so much more. You can check out each of our posts to help you get inspired and give you some creative new ideas. Take a look at these great posts below!

Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month, we will be sharing a themed Tuesday In The Garden post! We will be covering seasonal crops, herb gardening, growing flowers, DIY projects, garden gifts, harvesting tips, preserving, garden to table recipes and so much more. You can check out each of our posts to help you get inspired and give you some creative new ideas. Take a look at these great posts below!

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When I first started gardening, I couldn't wait to try growing strawberries! These red berries are jam-packed full of vitamins, fiber and antioxidants. I can never resist a bite of a plump, juicy and sweet strawberry. A Simple Guide To Growing Strawberries | Angie The Freckled Rose

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  • Heather
    May 23, 2017 at 8:38 am

    Thanks for all the info! We inherited a few plastic bins of strawberry plants that were left behind by the previous owners of our house, so I’m not sure what type they are. Despite us forgetting about them on the side of the house, they are thriving. I’d like to plant them but am not sure where they will do best. We are zone 9a and many “sun loving” vegetables here do better in less than full sun. What zone are you gardening in? Will they transplant again well if I end up realizing they need more or less sun?

    • Angie
      May 23, 2017 at 9:03 am

      Hi Heather! I garden in zone 6a Massachusetts. It’s always nice to inherit some plants from the previous owners! I have a beautiful peony and rose bush that were left behind by the owners before, and I just adore them. It’s great to hear that they are thriving! If they are strong plants that are currently doing well, you should have no trouble at all transplanting them! I would advise transplanting in the spring or the fall when they are not setting fruit. I actually transplanted a bunch of strawberries recently, and they are doing great! As long as you are getting a decent amount of berries, and the plants are vigorously growing, they are getting enough sun 🙂

      • Heather
        May 24, 2017 at 9:38 am

        Thanks! I will definitely wait until fall then so they don’t get zapped by the heat.

  • Heather
    May 23, 2017 at 8:39 am

    Thanks for all the info! We inherited a few plastic bins of strawberry plants that were left behind by the previous owners of our house, so I’m not sure what type they are. Despite us forgetting about them on the side of the house, they are thriving. I’d like to plant them but am not sure where they will do best. We are zone 9a and many “sun loving” vegetables here do better in less than full sun. Are they difficult to transplant again if I end up realizing they need more or less sun?

  • Diane Williams
    May 23, 2017 at 11:56 am

    So much GREAT info in this post! We are strawberry fans. We grow them in a raised bed, containers, hanging baskets and our DIY strawberry towers. You are so right. They do well just about anywhere. We prefer to put them into controlled growing conditions or they sprawl, get weedy and unmanageable for us. Thank for sharing all the strawberry varieties and explaining so well how to grow them. Strawberries are easy, but do require good mulch and fertilizer to bear the best fruit.

  • Chloe
    May 23, 2017 at 1:19 pm

    OOo! I love how informative this post was! I LOVE strawberries! I’ve been wanting to grow some but our backyard is so packed! Can’t wait till I move in a few months. Now I definitely feel inspired to grow some of my own produce! 🙂

    xo, Chloe // http://funinthecloset.com/crane-print/

  • Shelly
    May 23, 2017 at 5:24 pm

    Great post, Angie. We grow our strawberries in a raised bed and last year we had a bumper crop. We’re hoping for the same this year too and there are so many tiny berries forming right now, can’t wait until we can start harvesting.

    We battle slugs every year. There is nothing worse than picking a perfect looking strawberry only to turn it over and see a slug has eaten half of it. Yuck, we do cut off the chewed on parts and eat the rest.

    We also battle the squirrels for them too. The squirrels love to pick a berry then eat half of it in the tree and then throw them on the ground. Such a waste of food. If they are going to run off with them the least they could do is eat the whole berry.

  • Gina Hill
    May 23, 2017 at 5:53 pm

    What a beautiful blog. Such great info. I love growing strawberries. We are living somewhere temporarily for the summer, but I’m hoping that in our next place we can grow some more. They make such beautiful and delicious ground cover!

  • Skye
    May 23, 2017 at 5:56 pm

    I am so happy I found your blog! I am looking to start creating something more of my garden. However, I live beach front and a lot of my soil is VERY sandy. So if you have any soil tips and tricks, I would greatly appreciate your advice!

  • Jami
    May 23, 2017 at 6:29 pm

    Love sun ripened strawberries so much!! This is such a thorough guide, Angie, what a great job. I love how you added the potential problems with answers. 🙂

  • Jennifer Dunham
    May 24, 2017 at 2:30 am

    These are awesome tips! I have a large garden but have not tried strawberries yet. I would like to add them next year!

  • Cait Weingartner
    May 24, 2017 at 9:19 am

    Thanks for sharing these tips! Strawberries are my favorite summertime fruit, but I’d never considered growing my own before. Even though I’m definitely a novice gardener, this post makes it sound very do-able!

  • Patti
    May 24, 2017 at 12:56 pm

    Hi Angie,
    You make me want to grow strawberries! I haven’t done this for a long time. However, I must agree that there is nothing sweeter than a fresh picked strawberry. Your tips are great and I’m glad you’ve given me a few specific varieties to bring me up to date with some of the latest and best selections.

  • Jennifer
    May 24, 2017 at 3:59 pm

    Oh my goodness! What a wonderful post about growing strawberries! I’ve always wanted to grow strawberries but have had a slight fear {no clue why!} I think this would be a lot of fun for my granddaughter and I to grow!
    I am visiting you today from The Blog Boss Tribe!

  • Mother of 3
    May 24, 2017 at 9:22 pm

    Wow! This is chock full of great information. I remember trying to grow strawberries once with my mother using a pot but we had only a few berries and they mostly were eaten by bugs and birds by the time they were ripe enough to pick. Pinning in the hopes that maybe I can make a success of it!

  • riitta k
    May 24, 2017 at 10:21 pm

    You share so much useful information beautified with your lovely photos! Thank you so much Angie. I have to look the other posts too.

  • The Sane Mum
    May 25, 2017 at 2:28 am

    What a fantastic, informative post! The best results we ever had growing strawberries was in hanging baskets off the fence! They had about 8hrs a day of sunlight and the fruit hung out without touching the soil, so it was clean and never rotted! Unfortunately we removed our set up, we are soon heading away for a long holiday in a caravan (will be blogging my way through the preparations and the trip!) and are hoping to rent the house out while we’re gone! But will definitely do it again that way when we are back! 🙂

  • Monica
    May 25, 2017 at 3:07 pm

    This is a great in depth guide to strawberries! I grew up in Ventura, CA so I kind of assumed strawberries were super easy to grow, but when I moved to Portland I quickly found out otherwise. (For all you non-Venturians out there almost all of the strawberries grown in the US come out of Ventura, we just have the perfect climate for strawberries, citrus, and avocados.) Turns out all I need to do is tweak a few things to get those beautiful red berries again, thank you for the info!

  • Michelle Ramblingwoods
    May 25, 2017 at 5:49 pm

    Great informative post Angie. I learned a lot and enjoyed the photos. I have wild strawberries growing as a ground cover in parts of the garden. They have a very small fruit that I have never tried…Michelle

  • Christina
    May 25, 2017 at 5:52 pm

    This is my first year with strawberries in my garden. I can’t say it’s been fruitful but now I have an idea why! Thanks.

    sarriewebdesigns.com/blog

  • Jobie Medina
    May 25, 2017 at 6:12 pm

    This is great info. I looked up my zone. I’m in 4B. So I’m totally gonna plant these. I would love to start with these before starting a full garden. Just to know I could take care of it.

  • Lee@A Guide to Northeastern Gardnening
    May 25, 2017 at 6:52 pm

    This is a very informative and interesting post that makes me want to grow strawberries! I had grown them with my parents some years ago while growing up and had forgotten how rewarding they are. They also make a wonderful jams, as you had mentioned. Thank you for sharing with your wonderful post!

  • Delphine
    May 25, 2017 at 6:52 pm

    Thank you for this post, there is nothing like a freshly picked strawberry!

  • Mae B
    May 25, 2017 at 7:30 pm

    This was sooo helpful and informative – thank you! I love strawberries and have started to experiment with growing my own fruit / veg! xoxo

  • Amanda
    May 25, 2017 at 8:32 pm

    Great, thorough article! I have such a black thumb, I kill literally everything I plant. I’ve tried tomatoes, melons, all kinds of herbs, and flowers. Poor things don’t make it with me, no matter how I try. As much as I would love strawberries, I am scared to try. *cry*

  • Sharon
    May 25, 2017 at 8:58 pm

    My husband just got our garden all set up. We’ve added in some herbs but strawberries would be the best new addition!! I’ve got to send him this link so he can get them started haha!

  • Joscelyn | Wife Mama Foodie
    May 26, 2017 at 2:29 am

    Such a timely post! I literally just bought strawberry plants and some other vegetable plants today! I had bought some last year but they never produced fruit, only beautiful foliage. Do you know why that could’ve happened? Anyway, I bought them again this year determined not to give up! I just wish I had more of a green thumb!

  • Viviane Feeney
    May 26, 2017 at 4:53 am

    Cheers for the helpful and informative post! I’ve lost my green thumb since becoming occupied with blogging and life, but growing strawberries would be a good start! And really deliciously rewarding; fresh from the vine!

    https://dreamtraveleat.blogspot.com.au

  • Leah
    May 26, 2017 at 4:53 am

    Great Post. You have definitely convinced me to give strawberries a go. I have the most perfect most for a plant to go in. Thanks for the info. I will pin this for later!!

  • Rosalyn
    May 26, 2017 at 9:47 am

    Awesome posts! I’m a vegan and I want to learn more about gardening. Now what we live in a house I’ll be making time to learn more about gardening. I pinned this!

  • Umberta
    May 26, 2017 at 11:55 am

    Would love to have a garden or even a terrace to grow strawberries and other fruits or veggie!! 🙂

  • Dominique
    May 26, 2017 at 11:57 am

    I love gardening. Those are some award winning strawberries! I’ve never seen purple strawberry flowers before!

  • Cameron - Diary of a Southern Millennial
    May 26, 2017 at 2:08 pm

    I actually just picked up some root bundles and am planning to get them in the ground soon so this couldn’t have come at a better time! Good to know I can grow them anywhere too!

  • Molly
    May 26, 2017 at 3:59 pm

    This is SUCH great information! I’ve always wanted to grown my own strawberries, so I’m definitely filing this away for the future.

    Molly // Miss Molly Moon

  • Shannon Burlingame
    May 26, 2017 at 5:58 pm

    I live in a small apartment with a tiny patio. I have been searching for the perfect thing to grow there and I think I’ve found it! Such a thorough guide! Thanks for the help! 🙂

  • Jamianne
    May 26, 2017 at 8:18 pm

    Thanks for all the helpful info. I’m super excited about the idea of strawberry hanging baskets! Especially with our limited garden space. 🙂

  • Andrea
    May 28, 2017 at 9:31 pm

    Great post! I really like growing a combination of June Bearing and Ever-bearing so I can preserve with the June Bearers but still have lots of fresh to eat throughout the season!

  • Christine
    May 31, 2017 at 8:13 am

    I need this article right now. I am craving some strawberries in a smoothie. Plus with all the backyard work I am doing, fresh fruit would be nice to snack on, while out there!

  • Abigayle de Guzman
    May 31, 2017 at 6:25 pm

    Im craving strawberries now. Thank you for sharing! If I had a bigger place, I would’ve created a garden already.

  • Marian Mitchell
    May 31, 2017 at 6:32 pm

    I’m always amazed at how much goes into farming and varieties of produce. We just have no idea in our sheltered, grocery store world. Thank you so much for sharing!

  • Casey the College Celiac
    May 31, 2017 at 6:47 pm

    I never knew there were so many different types of strawberries! I had strawberry plants in college and, man, I’ve never tasted sweeter berries in my life!

  • Delphine
    May 31, 2017 at 7:14 pm

    Home grown strawberries are so much better than what you buy at the store. But I remember a lot of slugs being around… Well done on your success!

  • Sarah
    May 31, 2017 at 7:58 pm

    Wow such great tips! My kids love strawberries and I’m sure they’d love to grow them. I’ll keep this in mind!

  • Natalie @ Obsessive Cooking Disorder
    June 1, 2017 at 12:36 am

    I looove strawberries. We tried growing them but the ants/bugs kept getting to them first (and then our dog!)

  • Claire
    June 1, 2017 at 1:25 am

    Ooh would love to try growing some when we have a backyard again! The punnets are expensive!

  • Lisa Sell
    June 1, 2017 at 4:50 am

    I love strawberries. I have fond memories of going with my dad to work as he was a gardener and picking strawberries from the gardens of his clients – with permission! I wish I had a garden now to grow some in.

  • Sofia
    June 1, 2017 at 5:27 am

    Impressive! I’ve been toying with the idea of growing some fruits & veggies (and herbs) on my apartment balcony…may give it a shot this summer!

  • Annie @ Annie's Noms
    June 1, 2017 at 10:08 am

    Thank you SO much for this! I am utterly useless in the garden! I tried growing strawberries a few years ago and they took over half my garden, yet I only got one berry! I want to try again though, so will be bookmarking this for when I give it another go!

  • Louisa
    June 1, 2017 at 5:20 pm

    This really makes me wish I had a garden! I’ve always been under the impression that strawberries are hard to grow. These are amazing tips!

  • Bailey
    June 2, 2017 at 2:10 pm

    This is so helpful! I have such big ambitions of being a gardener but don’t know where to start.

  • PeeJay O'Malley
    June 12, 2017 at 6:17 pm

    Minor typo. Great site!

    “What is the best way to store my strawberries? . . . Make sure do [to] add a clean paper towel in the bottom of your container.”

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