76 In Gardening

Tips for Growing Peas in Your Garden

When you look out your window and you notice your daffodils beginning to bloom, it's time to plant your peas! After a long winter, peas are one of my favorite spring crops to grow. There are many types of peas you can harvest from your garden. Snap peas, snow peas and garden peas all have slightly different flavors and different methods of prep. If you are planning on growing peas, a good time to get them started is sometime in March a little before your average last frost date has passed. They can be started earlier in a hoop house or covered garden. You can also start the seeds indoors, and once they sprout, transfer them outside. Last winter, I planted them under a hoop house and was able to enjoy an early crop! Peas are very easy to grow and perfect for someone who is just starting out with growing edibles. If you follow these tips below, you will soon be enjoying a plethora of peas!

When you look out your window and you notice your daffodils beginning to bloom, it's time to plant your peas! After a long winter, they are one of my favorite spring crops to grow. There are more than one type of pea you can harvest from your garden. Snap peas, snow peas and shell peas all have slightly different flavors and different methods of prep. If you are planning on growing this crop, a good time to get them started is sometime in April when your average last frost date has passed. They can be started earlier in a hoop house or covered garden. You can also start the seeds indoors, and once they sprout, transfer them outside. Last winter, I planted them under a hoop house and was able to enjoy an early crop!

Choosing Your Peas

Snap Peas - Snap peas or sugar snap peas have a sweet flavor and a crunchy texture. You can feel free to eat the whole pod raw. You can also cook these peas, and trust me when I say they are delicious! These are probably my favorite variety to munch on while I'm busy doing daily garden chores. Most of them don't make it into the house. Some snap peas have strings, and I tend to choose the "stringless" variety. The strings can be tough to chew and sometimes have to be removed before eaten. 

Favorite Varieties: Sugar Snap pea, Sugar Ann Snap pea, Spring Bush Tendril pea 

Snow Peas - Snow peas or Chinese peas are flat and crisp with tiny peas inside. Again, the whole pod can be eaten, but the strings are usually removed first. They have a delicious mild flavor and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. They are the perfect addition to any stir-fry. Even though I am tempted to enjoy them raw from time to time, I usually save them to be whipped up in a tasty summer dish. Make sure to pick these peas before they get plump. I learned this the hard way!

Favorite Varieties: De Grace snow pea, Green Beauty pea, Mammoth Melting Sugar snow pea

Garden Peas - The very first peas I planted were garden peas! Garden peas or English peas have firm and rounded pods. The tasty round peas inside need to be removed from the pods or shelled before eaten. The pods can be discarded and composted. The peas found inside are sweet and can be eaten raw or cooked. You want to make sure you don't allow your peas to grow to big. The flavor tends to change, and they become more starchy. You also want to make sure you cook these fresh or freeze them after picking to get the best flavor. 

Favorite Varieties: Little Marvel garden pea, Alaska garden pea, Wando garden pea

- Rookie Mistake - When I first started gardening, I bought a bunch of seed packets containing different varieties of peas. I planted them all together on the same trellis, thinking why not? Well, they all grew and I had no idea what was what. I didn't know which ones were garden peas and which ones were snow peas. If you are planning to grow different varieties to enjoy, plant them separately and label them! This makes life so much easier.

snow peas or Chinese peas are flat and crisp with tiny peas inside. Again, the whole pod can be eaten, but the strings are usually removed first. They have a delicious mild flavor and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. They are the perfect addition to any stir-fry. Even though I am tempted to enjoy them raw from time to time, I usually save them to be whipped up in a tasty summer dish. Make sure to pick these peas before they start to swell. I learned this the hard way!

Planting Your Peas

Once you have chosen your varieties, now it's time to get planting! The most important thing to do is read up on the variety you have picked. You can start your seeds indoors or outdoors. If you are planting them outdoors, make sure your soil temperature is at least 40 degrees F. They can handle some frost and snow, but the growth rate is not fast. The cooler your soil temperature, the slower your plants will grow. I learned this when starting them under my winter hoop house. My plants grew, but instead of taking weeks to sprout, they took months. This can be done, but you just need to have patience! If you want to find out the best time to start your seeds, you can use this helpful starting date calculator

Starting Seeds Indoors - Start your seeds 3 to 4 weeks before you plan on planting them outdoors. They grow quickly, so you don't want to start them too early. Make sure you start your seeds in rich, seed starting soil mix. Put your new seeds under a grow light, and make sure this is on for 10 to 12 hours a day. Cover with 1 inch of fine soil and make sure to keep moist. Your seeds should emerge within 7 to 14 days.

Starting Seeds Outdoors - If you are planting in your raised garden bed, your seeds can be planted before your last frost date. I like to wait 8 weeks before my last frost date. I use protective measures like frost blankets, and I cover them at night. If you are starting your seeds in the ground, wait until 6 weeks before your last frost date. Plant your seeds in average soil in an area that receives full sun. I like to grow in rows about 6 inches apart. I try to give my seeds at least 2 inches of space. If you don't, you may have to do some thinning as your plants grow. 

Tip - If you want to enjoy multiple harvests, succession planting is the way to go with this crop. I like to give this crop a 10 day interval in between planting times. No matter how much you harvest, your pea plants will eventually lose steam and not produce as much. This method works best for me. I encourage you to experiment a bit and find what works best in your climate and growing zone.  

Once you have chosen your varieties, now it's time to get planting! The most important thing to do is read up on the variety you have picked. You can start your seeds indoors or outdoors. If you are planting them outdoors, make sure your soil temperature is at least 40 degrees F. They can handle some frost and snow, but the growth rate is not fast. The cooler your soil temperature the slower your plants will grow. I learned this when starting them under my winter hoop house. My plants grew, but instead of taking weeks to sprout, they took months. This can be done, you just need to have patience!

Product I Recommend : Burpee Bean & Pea Booster

Tip - If you want to enjoy multiple harvests, succession planting is the way to go with this crop. I like to give this crop a 10 day interval in between planting times. No matter how much you harvest, your pea plants will eventually loose steam and not produce as much. This method works best for me. I encourage you to experiment a bit and find what works best in your climate and growing zone.

Reach For The Sky

The first time I grew peas, I made the mistake of not trellising them early enough. I was growing a dwarf variety, and completely underestimated how messy they can get at any size. Even if you aren't getting a tall variety, they can become a tangled mess very quickly. They have tiny tendrils that grab onto whatever is close, even if it's another tendril. If you want to go in and clean them up once they have reached a certain size, you can really damage your plants. So the cautionary tale here is, even if you pick a smaller variety, give them some type of support. This will keep your plants happy and healthy. Most importantly, this will keep you sane!

You can use a wooden or metal trellis. Instead of going for something tall and skinny, I would go for something wider that still has some height depending on how many plants you have. I have tried very small trellises, and it becomes a mess once your plants outgrow it. Make sure to check on the package before you plant, that way you know what size trellis you are looking for.

Peas growing up my wooden trellis is 2015

Trellis options - You can use a wooden or metal trellis. Instead of going for something tall and skinny, I would go for something wider that still has some height depending on how many plants you have. I have tried very small trellises, and it becomes a mess once your plants outgrow it. Make sure to check on the package before you plant, that way you know what size trellis you are looking for.  

Another great option is creating an inexpensive teepee using bamboo stakes and wire or twine. I personally love this option. This really holds up in bad weather and heavy winds. I grow all my beans this way. I have switched some of my peas to this method over time. 

The third option is using wire fencing. You can purchase this and pretty much make a support system to whatever custom size you require. The wire is sturdy, and the taller the plants really appreciate this. Again, it's easy and inexpensive! Whatever supplies you can get your hands on, even strings and stakes, trust me when I say something is better than nothing!

Be Prepared: Before you start building your own trellis, it's best to have a good pair of wire cutters on hand. I recommend Fiskars Garden Multi-Snip. This razor-sharp blade makes working with heavy duty materials so much easier. 

Dwarf/Bush Varieties - Anywhere from 2 to 4 feet tall

Tall Climbing Vines - Anywhere from 6 to 9 feet tall

Most peas are ready to be harvested in about 3 months. Make sure you check your seed packets, because every variety is different. You can start to tell they are ready to pick when the coat of the pod becomes waxy. The peas begin to swell, and the color is bright green. It's better to pick them smaller, these tend to be sweeter. Try not to wait to long and let them get too big. I've learned that they mature from the bottom up, so this is an easy way to check on your plant. These healthy treats taste best fresh. The longer you want, the starchier they taste. If you can't eat them right away, make sure to store them in the refrigerator or freezer right after picking.

Harvesting Your Peas

Most peas are ready to be harvested in about 3 months. Make sure you check your seed packets, because every variety is different. You can start to tell they are ready to pick when the coat of the pod becomes waxy. The peas begin to swell, and the color is bright green. It's better to pick them smaller. These tend to be sweeter. Try not to wait too long and let them get too big. I've learned that they mature from the bottom up, so this is an easy way to check on your plant.These healthy treats taste best fresh. The longer you want, the starchier they taste. If you can't eat them right away, make sure to store them in the refrigerator or freezer right after picking. Don't be afraid to shell your peas. I've actually found this to be a rather relaxing task!

These healthy treats taste best fresh. The longer you want, the starchier they taste. If you can't eat them right away, make sure to store them in the refrigerator or freezer right after picking. Don't be afraid to shell your peas. I've actually found this to be a rather relaxing task! There are so many different ways to cook and snack on these flavorful plants. They can be added to just about any dish or eaten alone as a side. Last year, I shared a fun recipe on the blog. I like to enjoy them in salads and of course, a stir-fry.

There are so many different ways to cook and snack on these flavorful plants. They can be added to just about any dish or eaten alone as a side. Last year, I shared a fun recipe on the blog. I like to enjoy them in salads and of course, a stir-fry.

You can check out my recipe here - Easy Sumer Garden Stir-fryMy favorite way to give yesterday's meal a whole new delicious identity is by making a stir-fry.  It's so nice after a long day of harvesting out in the heat to whip up something quick and tasty!

My biggest advice is to really enjoy and try every part of your pea plant. Take advantage of how beautiful the blooms and flowers are in the garden. Taste the peas fresh and cooked, and don't forget to add the shoots to your salads. They are just as delicious as the peas themselves! Check on them daily, and don't be afraid to pick! The more often you pick, the more pods you will get. I didn't know this fact when I first started. I'm happy I learned that over time. Don't forget that these plants benefit your garden soil, adding nitrogen and making it nice and rich. It's so much fun trying different varieties. Every year, try something different if you like.Are you thinking of growing peas this spring? Do you have a favorite kind of pea you like to grow? Tell me all about it in the comment section below. The next edition of Tuesdays In The Garden will be April 11, and we will be sharing with you our favorite garden tools. See you then!

Are you thinking of growing peas this spring? Do you have a favorite kind of pea you like to grow? Tell me all about it in the comment section below. The next edition of Tuesdays In The Garden will be April 11, and we will be sharing with you our favorite garden tools. See you then!

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Tuesdays In The Garden | Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month, we will be sharing a themed Tuesday In The Garden post! We will be covering seasonal crops, herb gardening, growing flowers, DIY projects, garden gifts, harvesting tips, preserving, garden to table recipes and so much more. You can check out each of our posts to help you get inspired and give you some creative new ideas. Take a look at these great posts below!

Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month, we will be sharing a themed Tuesday In The Garden post! We will be covering seasonal crops, herb gardening, growing flowers, DIY projects, garden gifts, harvesting tips, preserving, garden to table recipes and so much more. You can check out each of our posts to help you get inspired and give you some creative new ideas. Take a look at these great posts below!


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When you look out your window and you notice your daffodils beginning to bloom, it's time to plant your peas! After a long winter, they are one of my favorite spring crops to grow. There are more than one type of pea you can harvest from your garden. Snap peas, snow peas and garden peas all have slightly different flavors and different methods of prep. If you are planning on growing this crop, a good time to get them started is sometime in March a little before your average last frost date has passed. They can be started earlier in a hoop house or covered garden. You can also start the seeds indoors, and once they sprout, transfer them outside. Last winter, I planted them under a hoop house and was able to enjoy an early crop! Peas are very easy to grow and perfect for someone who is just starting out with growing edibles. If you follow these tips below, you will soon be enjoying a plethora of peas!

 

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76 Comments

  • Reply
    Patti
    March 28, 2017 at 8:17 am

    Hi Angie,

    Okay you are making me want to get out and grow some peas. I often think about growing sweet peas for their beauty and fragrance. I can see from your photos that edible peas have a similar pretty flower in white. My mom used to grow sugar snap peas every year. I think I’d like to try snow peas too.
    Have a great spring week!
    Patti

  • Reply
    Michelle Marine
    March 28, 2017 at 10:03 am

    I can’t wait for fresh peas. I love growing them in my garden. And I’ve made that same rookie mistake – often and with all garden produce. LOL!!! 😉

  • Reply
    Diane Williams
    March 28, 2017 at 11:30 am

    One of our favorite spring garden strolls is to go past the peas and check for ready pods. Nothing better than fresh peas. I love them all but I do enjoy the snow pease on the vine best. I hardly ever get enough for the kitchen. Looking at your post I want to get out there and pick! Grow peas grow!

  • Reply
    Shelly
    March 28, 2017 at 12:22 pm

    These are great tips, Angie. We love to grow sugar snap peas at our house. We can usually get them in around President’s day but this year has been too wet and I’ll be getting them in late.

    One tip that I’ve found useful is to sprout the peas inside before planting them outside if you live in a wet area like we do. I put the peas inside a wet paper towel and place them in a zippered baggie. If you leave them on top of the refrigerator for a few days, they will sprout and then plant them in the garden. When they are already sprouted they keep growing. If I don’t sprout them they can get too wet, rot, and the seeds are wasted.

  • Reply
    Theresa
    March 28, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    I love your tip about succession planting! I am going to try that. The chart you linked to was also very helpful!

  • Reply
    Ashton
    March 28, 2017 at 1:33 pm

    I am so excited to plant my vegetable garden with the kids this year and try a couple of varieties of peas. That was a very informational and inspiring post. Thank you!

  • Reply
    Jennifer Dunham
    March 28, 2017 at 5:32 pm

    These are some really helpful tips! Peas are one vegetable that I have never tried growing, but I want to try to add them to my garden this year. 🙂

  • Reply
    Jami
    March 28, 2017 at 11:47 pm

    This post is so chock full of good info, Angie! Thank you – I totally agree with the trellising and that’s the only thing that I always wish I spent more time on in spring. 🙂

  • Reply
    Lucy M. Clark
    March 29, 2017 at 12:41 am

    After reading your blog, I am going straight to my garden and try all three varieties of peas mentioned by you. I also love peas but I have never grown it my garden. But you made it look so easy, now I will definitely try this.

  • Reply
    Berniedette of PetiteAndToned.com
    March 29, 2017 at 2:27 am

    OMG, those peas look so crisp and amazing! I wish I had your green thumb! I can’t even keep a bouquet of flowers alive for a week! eeks!

    xoxo,

    Berniedette | PetiteAndToned.com

  • Reply
    riitta k
    March 29, 2017 at 2:46 am

    Wonderful pea photos & summer views. I can taste and smell the peas from here! Have a bright sunny day Angie – thank you for linking!

    https://floral-passions.blogspot.fi/2017/03/floral-bliss-14.html

  • Reply
    Mimi Rose
    March 29, 2017 at 3:31 am

    I’m currently traveling full-time so I don’t have access to my own place to grow peas, but a small indoor or outdoor garden is high on my list for when I do settle down. We used to have peas like this in my backyard growing up, I would love to try and grow them myself.

  • Reply
    robin Rue
    March 29, 2017 at 5:41 am

    My husband JUST mentioned to me last night that he wanted to start a garden. Peas are defintiely on our list.

  • Reply
    Nina
    March 29, 2017 at 5:42 am

    Sugar snap peas are so good! If I had the space to grow a few things, I would love to grow some!

  • Reply
    Brandy
    March 29, 2017 at 9:19 am

    This is really a comprehensive guide! We have clay soil and I’ve yet to be able to get anything to really grow, despite mixing in outside soil. I’d love to have snap peas at my disposal!

  • Reply
    Katherine McDermott
    March 29, 2017 at 10:38 am

    Love this! So comprehensive and thorough. When we move into our new house next month, I can’t wait to start a garden! Will definitely check back here for advice because I just know I am going to mess stuff up!

  • Reply
    karen
    March 29, 2017 at 11:26 am

    I’m so super impressed with your green thumb! I would need to do a major overhaul in the backyard to plant anything (we have lots of deer, raccoons, etc…) so I am thinking I need a major fence (just for starters) which might overwhelm me! haha…

  • Reply
    Elizabeth
    March 29, 2017 at 11:52 am

    These photos make me swoon!

  • Reply
    Christina
    March 29, 2017 at 12:49 pm

    Hi Angie, thanks for this great, informative, and thorough post about growing peas! I only grow ornamental flowers, but you definitively are tempting me to grow peas. If I can grow Sweet Peas I can grow peas, right?
    Warm regards,
    Christina

  • Reply
    Joanna @ Everyday Made Fresh
    March 29, 2017 at 2:08 pm

    This is only my second year of gardening. Last year we planted from seeds, and only had 3 okra. This year we went with plants. But I didn’t do any peas. If the garden actually turns out this year, I’ll add peas next year, because my girls love peas.

  • Reply
    Kristen from The Road to Domestication
    March 29, 2017 at 3:21 pm

    Fantastic! I’ve actually never tried to grow peas before. Yours are so beautiful and inspiring!

  • Reply
    Charli
    March 29, 2017 at 3:53 pm

    Yum! There’s nothing like fresh peas from the garden! I have fond memories of pillaging my grandmas garden for fresh peas when we would visit in the summer!

  • Reply
    Thesocialbeing721
    March 29, 2017 at 4:15 pm

    Thanks for the tips with snap peas!

  • Reply
    Lacee
    March 29, 2017 at 6:11 pm

    I pinned this and hope to use these tips this year!

    http://laceedoeslife.com

  • Reply
    Tess Chupinsky
    March 29, 2017 at 6:24 pm

    So glad I stumbled across your page! I’m moving to a new home and finally have the room to start gardening! Definitely will need the guidance though!

  • Reply
    Carolyn
    March 29, 2017 at 7:45 pm

    We have a garden every summer and I wanted to add green beans this summer but maybe I’ll try peas too. Such great directions, thanks for making it seem simple.

  • Reply
    Teresa
    March 29, 2017 at 7:55 pm

    oh you are so lucky to be able to plant your garden already. We are in the midwest and it is still way too early here. But we always love to plant peas. they NEVER make indoors as everyone eats them beforehand!

  • Reply
    Terri Steffes
    March 29, 2017 at 8:04 pm

    I love fresh peas. My grandmother used to grow them and would let us eat them right out of the garden, the same with cherry tomatoes. Yum.

  • Reply
    Elizabeth O.
    March 29, 2017 at 8:50 pm

    This is really helpful. I love growing veggies and I’ve never tried growing peas before. This is such a nice guide.

  • Reply
    hey sharonoox
    March 29, 2017 at 9:37 pm

    Definitely planning to plant snap peas this spring. Not sure if we can plant japanese edamame. Waiting for the frost to melt before head out to the garden. Thanks for the tips for the snap peas!

  • Reply
    Leigh Anne Borders
    March 29, 2017 at 11:04 pm

    These are some great ideas. I will share with my husband. He is planting a garden in our backyard.

  • Reply
    Bel
    March 30, 2017 at 12:24 am

    I used to grow a lot of stuff as a kid. Right now, I can’t anymore because there’s no space but once I can, i will. BTW lovely garden

  • Reply
    Lindsey
    March 30, 2017 at 12:46 am

    How gorgeous do your peas look. I was just talking to friends about getting the garden sorted and having a corner to grow vegetables, and low and behold, I stumbled across you great blog, these tips will certainly come in handy x

  • Reply
    Annemarie LeBlanc
    March 30, 2017 at 2:45 am

    Thanks for these tips! We love peas and I wish I had the time to plant some in our backyard. I’ll see if it would be feasible to do that. I don’t want to start planting them and not give them the attention they need afterwards.

  • Reply
    Sarah Bailey
    March 30, 2017 at 3:18 am

    I like to stir-fry peas with other vegetables and cashews. Then, serve it with steamed rice. I would want to grow peas in my backyard too. I will remember your article.

  • Reply
    Fiona
    March 30, 2017 at 4:47 am

    Great tips, we are just starting out at growing our veggies!

  • Reply
    Ana John
    March 30, 2017 at 4:56 am

    I like to do gardening in my free time. It feels so good eating fresh vegetables directly plucked from the garden. I would follow your tips and this time will go for growing pea in my garden.

  • Reply
    Blythe Alpern
    March 30, 2017 at 7:07 am

    I’ve always wanted a garden where I could grow veggies. I wonder how peas would do in the Florida soil, which can be a bit sandy sometimes. It would be fun to give it a go.

  • Reply
    Jessi
    March 30, 2017 at 10:39 am

    I tried gardening one year, but sadly it turned out to be such a mess and everything died. I am so not a green thumb but I kind of want to try again now that I have been reading up on it more.

  • Reply
    Ana De- Jesus
    March 30, 2017 at 11:05 am

    This is why I want my own garden, I do like peas and the thought of growing my own veggies makes me long for a place of my own. Some day! x

  • Reply
    Kelly Hutchinson
    March 30, 2017 at 11:11 am

    I have such a brown thumb! I would love to be able to grow sugar snap peas for my husband and daughter. They love them!

  • Reply
    Love U Wedding
    March 30, 2017 at 12:14 pm

    i also love to stir fry peas! they said it’s weird but you gotta try it!! it taste good!

  • Reply
    Oyinkan Ogunleye
    March 30, 2017 at 12:30 pm

    I’ve never had to think of how peas are created! This gave me a bit of insight.

  • Reply
    Lydia
    March 30, 2017 at 4:22 pm

    As someone who doesn’t garden but would love to start one, these are perfect tips! I love peas, you’ve inspired me to grow some this summer!

  • Reply
    Tereza
    March 30, 2017 at 5:01 pm

    I saw this post on Pinterest and knew I had to read it! I love peas and grow them every year, will definitely be bookmarking this post for when we’re sowing them on the weekend! Thank you for sharing! xx

  • Reply
    Erin
    March 30, 2017 at 9:24 pm

    I loved reading about the seed packet ordeal. It reminded me of the time I mislabeled my tomatoes – I didn’t know which were determinate and which were indeterminate. I literally caged the indeterminate and staked the determinate. It was such a hot mess trying to add cages to the determinate when I realized my mistake!!

  • Reply
    karlyn cruz
    March 31, 2017 at 2:52 am

    A great tips! Sounds good. Maybe I might to try gardening. Lol! This post really helps.

  • Reply
    Kerri
    March 31, 2017 at 6:33 am

    Your detailed steps are great for a newbie like me. My daughters have been asking to plant and I have no idea where to begin.

  • Reply
    Jojo Vito | The Happy Trip
    March 31, 2017 at 6:57 am

    We stArted to plant in our small backyard some organic veggies. It’s nice to know where your food is coming from. Thank you for this post.

  • Reply
    Carol
    March 31, 2017 at 8:25 am

    I always enjoy reading your posts – you are a master at gardening!

  • Reply
    Kristen
    March 31, 2017 at 8:27 am

    We love to garden but found to have the worst soil. We are doing something different this year in hopes that we have a successful garden. These are some great tips and will be trying to grow some peas this year!

  • Reply
    Jay Simms
    March 31, 2017 at 8:57 am

    I have heard that it is very easy to grow peas in a garden! I am going to give it a try.

  • Reply
    Ali Rost
    March 31, 2017 at 11:16 am

    Fresh peas in the garden are the absolute best! Every year I tell myself I’m going to wait until I get home .. but inevitably I can’t resist their sweet taste and crunchy outside. Just a few more months and we’ll have some again!

  • Reply
    Reesa Lewandowski
    March 31, 2017 at 12:13 pm

    OH!! Well then it is time for me to plant some peas!! I love how easy it is to grow fresh peas.

  • Reply
    Nikki
    March 31, 2017 at 1:59 pm

    Man, your garden is amazing! I wish I could do even a portion of what you do, but I am going to look through what you have to try to start small with some herbs. I don’t have much time right now, but I would like to start something this fall.

  • Reply
    eazynazy
    March 31, 2017 at 2:22 pm

    Omg i never knew it so easy to grow peas…Thanks for sharing

  • Reply
    Kristin
    March 31, 2017 at 3:47 pm

    I am sooo jealous of your garden! It’s beautiful. I would totally love to try my hand at growing peas!

  • Reply
    Jeanine
    March 31, 2017 at 4:55 pm

    I would love to plant peas in a garden. i actually havent had a garden in a few year and would love to start one again! We go through so many veggies, i would love a veg garden!

  • Reply
    Amber Nelson
    March 31, 2017 at 10:40 pm

    I cannot wait until I can start planting our garden. It will be at least another month or so before we can do so.

  • Reply
    Jennifer L
    April 1, 2017 at 2:29 am

    I dont have the greatest green thumb so this is so perfect for me. Thank you for the amazing tips on growing peas. Would love to have some on my backyard.

  • Reply
    Hannah Marie
    April 1, 2017 at 12:23 pm

    This is really interesting! Thank you for the tips, I might start gardening soon and this is a really great help 🙂

  • Reply
    Echo
    April 2, 2017 at 1:33 pm

    Thank you so much for all of these tips! I can’t wait to start my garden and I definitely want to grow snap peas! I love them!

  • Reply
    Katy SkipTheBag
    April 2, 2017 at 3:37 pm

    Snap peas are my favorite! We just put some beans in the ground and are using a tomato cage rather than a trellis. Your trellis are beautiful. Thanks for sharing on the Waste Less Wednesday Blog Hop!

  • Reply
    Coralie
    April 2, 2017 at 3:39 pm

    I am getting ready to plant peas for the first time. We just moved and I am excited to get a garden going. I have just started my indoor starters. Hope they turn out good. Thanks for all of the info.

  • Reply
    Fiona Cambouropoulos
    April 2, 2017 at 5:32 pm

    There’s nothing quite like fresh peas #InspireMeMonday

  • Reply
    wendy
    April 2, 2017 at 8:51 pm

    I love fresh veggies! Plus you, I think, enjoy them more when you grow them yourself. I know they are healthier. You know what you put on them and around them! Beautiful Pictures!

  • Reply
    Michelle@ramblingwoods
    April 2, 2017 at 10:53 pm

    There is nothing like fresh peas out of the garden. I learn so much from your posts and they are such an inspiration. Next season, I am going to try to grow some veg….Michelle

  • Reply
    Kecia | From Mom's Desk
    April 3, 2017 at 9:49 am

    I didn’t know you couldn’t combine the different varieties of peas into the same gardening area. Makes sense now that I read your post though!

  • Reply
    Misty Nelson Dawn
    April 3, 2017 at 10:02 am

    What a good tips and I love this I want to learn how to grow veggies on my Garden

  • Reply
    Aish Das-Padihari
    April 3, 2017 at 7:02 pm

    I’m going to start a veggie patch in my yard this summer and this post will help me get there. Thanks!

  • Reply
    Claudia Blanton
    April 4, 2017 at 3:36 pm

    I love peas! My dad used to grow them in our very large garden, and we always had so many that we had to give some of them away. I miss gardening, but at least in our new home we have a very large patio, which I am planning to fill with as many plants as possible, blessings!

  • Reply
    Nicole
    April 4, 2017 at 3:54 pm

    I would love to have my own little garden with veggies and fruits! Great tips, will hopefully get to try it out some day!

  • Reply
    Wildish Jess
    April 4, 2017 at 6:34 pm

    I have a problem with just keeping plants alive! I hope to have a garden in our next house though!

  • Reply
    Marla
    April 5, 2017 at 9:39 am

    I love sugar peas although I like a peas. I love your garden and how you built the trellis. Looks like it would save a lot of work. Thanks for all the information on peas – I have learned some valuable tips that I didn’t know before especially starting your own seeds with peas. I love putting fresh Spring peas in salads as you did. Congratulations on being featured on #WasteLessWednesdays. Pinned & tweeted. Happy Spring!

  • Reply
    Deb
    April 8, 2017 at 1:30 pm

    With successive planting, can you plant the new seeds right next to the older plants? Also, my pea plants often die off at the bottom even while the top stays grew and produces. Is this a disease? Is it normal?
    Thanks. Loved your tips!

  • Reply
    Angela Milnes
    April 19, 2017 at 9:19 pm

    This is awesome. I love peas and really want to start growing beg in the garden. Thanks for the tips.

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